2,700-year-old Persian artifact a gift of U.S. diplomacy to Iran?

Very interesting developments are occurring between the US and Iran. The old hard line from both sides appears to be giving way to a thawing that has all the hall marks of something good.

Washington (CNN) — A 2,700 year-old silver chalice may be a new token of friendship between the United States and Iran, at least that’s the way Iran’s cultural heritage chief sees it.

Whatever the case, Mohammad-Ali Najafi was palpably delighted Friday to see the ancient Persian artifact return to its homeland. The ceremonial drinking vessel — or rhyton — had gotten snagged in a U.S. customs warehouse for years, held up by bad diplomatic relations.

It had been in New York since 2003, when an art dealer smuggled it into the country from Iran.

Customs officials have long wanted to return the rhyton to Iran, according to a New York Post report. But decades of frigid relations between Washington and Tehran kept it frozen in bureaucratic limbo.

The issues between countries will never be solved by head to head rhetoric, and perhaps Obama’s recent success with Syria, even taking into account a lot of back peddling was involved, may have motivated more possibilities……

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Comparisons are being made of the latest round of mutual international diplomacy as being a ruse by Iran to ward off the now famous threat by Israel of what stage they will be forced to act .

In September of 2012, Benjamin Netanyahu famously gave his U.N. “red line” speech outlining the three stages of nuclear weapons development, and the point at which Israel would have no other course but to attack Iran.   Experts put that at the point that Iran has amassed enough uranium, purified to a level of 20 percent, that could quickly be enriched further and be used to produce an atomic bomb.

“At this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent Iran from getting atomic bombs. That’s by placing a clear red line on Iran’s nuclear program,” Netanyahu said.

Others like myself do not believe this to be the case, as the Iranians may have enough fusion material for perhaps two or even three nuclear weapons. The relevance of this is that they are still outmatched in conventional weapons, by the US. In addition the Israeli’s have a reported 80 nuclear weapons, and the US has enough to end the planet.

Assuming you have three or even 30, heck go for gold and assume its 300 nuclear weapons, they are still tactically outmatched for sheer power, and the means to deliver, from all directions 24hrs a day.

Survival is to any country, regardless of its affiliations is of prime importance, and and action that results in the destruction of everything that would require decades to recover from cannot be an option.

Regardless of how we are brainwashed into thinking that we are mixing with third world despots, we are looking at the oldest modern civilization on earth, who has been through many crisis in their 7/8000yr history. None of which was to push to self annihilation.

Even when Sarin was killing a million of their own people when fighting a Iraq war led by Saddam Hussein, and backed by the US, they did not respond in kind, when, they could have.

Indeed it has been more than 600 yrs since Iran declared war on anyone, so why would we believe that they have changed today. If the comparison is made to the US who has dropped two nuclear bombs and been in continuous war for some 70 years, why would we believe that there has been a shift in the view that the Iranians have on war?

The problem of course is that threatening the Iranians continually, and allowing these threats to be made openly on US soil will force the prophecy to be self fulfilling on the basis that self preservation sometimes dictates that nuclear weapons are bad, but prudence forces the obvious solutions to external threats.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-17261265

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